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Salmiakki (Finnish candy)


Youtube has dozens of videos of people around the world trying salmiakki aka salty liquorice aka Finnish(/Swedish/Danish) candy.

Many of them react like this:





Let me explain what salmiakki is, the way it's understood in Finland. We have basically four types of candy. At least half, but possibly over 90% of all candies can be defined into these four types:
1. chocolate
2. liquorice
3. fruit-flavored
4. salmiakki

Now, you'll notice liquorice and salmiakki are entirely different groups. A Finn - myself included - is confused hearing first time salmiakki referred as "salty liquorice".
Firstly, liquorice? What's salmiakki got to do with liquorice? Well, now that I'm looking at ingredients, most salmiakki candies actually do have liquorice in them; most of us salmiakki-eaters never realize that.
Secondly, although the stuff itself is a salt, most of us wouldn't describe it as "salty". Salmiakki is a specific flavor of candy. (Or ice cream or alcohol or meat product...)

"Salmiakki" comes from "Sal Ammoniac" ("Salt of Amun/Ammon"), Latin name of the substance: ammonium chloride. Wikipedia:
quote:

Ammonium chloride is an inorganic compound with the formula NH4Cl and a white crystalline salt that is highly soluble in water. Solutions of ammonium chloride are mildly acidic. Sal ammoniac is a name of the natural, mineralogical form of ammonium chloride. The mineral is commonly formed on burning coal dumps from condensation of coal-derived gases. It is also found around some types of volcanic vents. It is mainly used as fertilizer and a flavouring agent in some types of liquorice. It is the product from the reaction of hydrochloric acid and ammonia.

You read right.
"Found around volcanic vents."
"Product from the reaction of hydrochloric acid and ammonia."
And we Nordics - have to share the credit with Scandinavia, it's not just Finland - eat that for candy.

2012 EU actually tried to ban products with over 0.3% ammonium chloride; salmiakki candies have as much as 7%. Fortunately they couldn't do it, but it probably wouldn't have mattered anyway: Finland, Sweden and Denmark mostly produce it for domestic markets and EU could've only forbidden exports. (Unlike with chocolate, the damn bastards.)

Getting back to the 4 types, the thing that mostly separates salmiakki from liquorice (besides taste) is texture. Salmiakki candies are typically similar to fruit candies, just with this different flavor, while liquorice has its own texture.

I myself enjoy salmiakki daily. I have salmiakki gum after three meals, practically every day. And a couple pieces of other salmiakki along day. Unless I happen to have an actual bag of salmiakki candy, to do 100-200 grams of the stuff. Maybe even more in Christmas.
And why not throw in some Salmiakki Koskenkorva...



Last edited by Kaunisto, Jul/21/2016, 1:35


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Jul/1/2016, 1:41 Link to this post Send PM to Kaunisto
 
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The Big Boss
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Re: Salmiakki


I want to point out this one particular candy: Noitapilli, "Witch Whistle".
(There may have been some type/brand of fireworks it's named after, I'm not sure.)
These are unique, very different from any other salmiakki candy. It's small liquorice pipe covered with some kind of sugar with filling that's flavored with salmiakki.

I love them, it's been ages since I had any, I hope they still make them.



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Jul/21/2016, 1:34 Link to this post Send PM to Kaunisto
 
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Re: Salmiakki (Finnish candy)


International salmiakki...

]TRY&CRY – Salty licorice variety pack

This collection of salmiakki candies from five countries has apparently become a standard for youtube tasting videos, so I'll comment shortly the types I'm familiar with.


Salmiakkiruutu: This is your basic Finnish salmiakki, more typical than many seen in "Finnish candy" videos (which are covered with salmiakki powder or with sugar like Pantteri brand). It's also average in flavor, certainly not mild but also far from anything face twisting.
"Ruutu" means square or box, but in salmiakki it's this traditional diamond shape - which more generally would be called diagonal ruutu.

Salmiakkimatto (which for some reason is with Swedish name on that list):
One of our oldest and most popular licorice products is "licorice mat" by Halva. It's about 15X4 centimeters bar that is actually three layers you can peel and eat one by one (recommendable) or shove in your mouth as triple (not recommendable).
Salmiakki mat is simply the salmiakki flavored version of it. I don't particularly like that one. It's pretty mild, if Ruutu was 3/5, the Mat is 2/5. Both are also sold in bags in square pieces which is what you see here.

Salt Skulls (from Sweden):
These are awesome! Not really your typical salmiakki, but more like... you know how uninformed foreigners call salmiakki "super salty licorice"? This is super salty salmiakki. Super salty super salty licorice.
While most salmiakki I would eat like bread, these skulls twist my face same as people in videos around the world. One eats these for same reason as a raw kiwi, for that "Whoooaaahh!" feeling (or because you were dared or lost a bet or...)
The thing here is actually the salmiakki(=ammonium chloride) powder the skulls are covered with; once it's melted in your mouth the rest is almost regular licorice.

Peberlinser (from Denmark):
I'm not quite sure if these the ones I've eaten, but I think so. Very sharp, stinging flavor inside. Pretty strong sort of salmiakki, 4/5.

I'm not sure if Djungelvral are what I think, but they are it's very much like the skulls, just in small bits.

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Jul/28/2016, 0:28 Link to this post Send PM to Kaunisto
 
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Re: Salmiakki (Finnish candy)


These I literally eat daily. It's my snack candy, because it's something you can have just one and then put nothing in your mouth for an hour.



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Aug/21/2016, 23:56 Link to this post Send PM to Kaunisto
 
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Re: Salmiakki (Finnish candy)


On related note, I'm rather sick of salmiakki right now, from the christmas candies.

Still have some Tyrkisk Peber to go...
They're not kidding when calling it "original". It got milder at some point for years, but this TP Original is really the way they used to be.



As a comment to that video: it's kind of an aftertaste that's the hottest part; and it perhaps intensifies when you eat several one after another.



Edit: btw I also had some Noitapilli (see earlier post), still great as ever

Last edited by Kaunisto, Dec/28/2016, 18:06


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